New Heaven

Cecilia Mandrile reflecting on her work to her students in Seton Gallery at the University of New Haven
Cecilia Mandrile reflecting on her work to her students in Seton Gallery at the University of New Haven

Retrospective: Cecilia Mandrile
Coordinated By Laura Marsh
Curated By Elvis Fuentes
Yuneikys Villalonga

For Cecilia Mandrile, the experience of art is like the experience of life. In it, artworks are born sometimes in blessed circumstances, sometimes in painful ones. They grow (in meaning); they mature and age. They could also re-invent themselves once in a while. In this world, museums become hospices of sort, homes for the aging works of art, which require care. Maybe that’s why their custodians are named curators, a word that has its roots in curare.

Mandrile’s art-making process became a workshop for metaphorically healing and repairing bodies, very much in the way heaven is promised to us.  And yet she was able to infuse this promise with her own inner world. Early in her career, she was attracted to printmaking. This imprint remained central to her work for years. Using a digital, portable matrix, Mandrile multiplied an undistinguishable image of herself on every imagined surface to create toys and dolls. In doing so, she connected with the tradition of icon-making, an ancient technique that she then developed with contemporary tools.

Read the Full Release

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